Author - PeopleWiki

Andrew Solomon

Andrew Solomon (born October 30, 1963) is a writer on politics, culture and psychology, who lives in New York City and London. He has written for The New York Times, The New Yorker, Artforum, Travel and Leisure, and other publications on a range of subjects, including depression, Soviet artists, the cultural rebirth of Afghanistan, Libyan politics, and Deaf politics.
Solomon’s book The Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression won the 2001 National Book Award, was a finalist for the 2002 Pulitzer Prize, and was included in The Times list of one hundred best books of the decade. Honors awarded to Far from the Tree: Parents, Children, and the Search for Identity include the 2012 National Book Critics Circle Award, the Media for a Just Society Award of the National Council on Crime and Delinquency, the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award, the Dayton Literary Peace Prize, the J. Anthony Lukas Book Prize, and the Wellcome Book Prize.
Solomon is a Professor of Clinical Psychology at Columbia University Medical Center, and President of PEN American Center.

John Bisset Chapman

John Bisset Chapman’s biography, age, height, fact, career, awards, net worth, salary, income, family tree, personal life and life story.

Rosalind Northcote

Rosalind Northcote’s biography, age, height, fact, career, awards, net worth, salary, income, family tree, personal life and life story.

Peter Viereck

Peter Robert Edwin Viereck (August 5, 1916 – May 13, 2006) was an American poet, political thinker, and long-time professor of history at Mount Holyoke College.

Tom Lord

Thomas „Tom“ D. Lord (* 27. Juli 1940) ist ein kanadischer Jazz-Diskograph.

Kay Boyle

Kay Boyle (February 19, 1902 – December 27, 1992) was an American novelist, short story writer, educator, and political activist.

Nancy Atherton

Nancy Atherton is an American writer and author of the Aunt Dimity mystery novel series, which presently extends to twenty-one volumes.
Atherton lives in Colorado Springs, Colorado.

Stephanie Nolen

Stephanie Nolen (born September 3, 1971 in Montreal, Quebec) is a Canadian journalist and writer. She is currently the Latin America bureau chief for The Globe and Mail. From 2008 to 2013, she was the Globe’s South Asia Bureau Chief, based in New Delhi. From 2003 to 2008, she was the Globe’s Africa bureau chief, and she has reported from more than 60 countries around the world. She is a seven-time National Newspaper Awards winner for her work in Africa and India. She is tied for the most NNA wins in the history of the awards. Nolen is a four-time recipient of the Amnesty International Award for Human Rights Reporting. Her book on Africa’s AIDS pandemic, 28: Stories of AIDS in Africa, was nominated for the 2007 Governor General’s Literary Award and has been published in 15 countries. She is the co-founder of the Museum of AIDS in Africa. She currently lives in Rio de Janeiro.

Roy MacLaren (politician)

Roy MacLaren, PC (born 26 October 1934), is a Canadian politician, diplomat, historian, and author.
Born in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, he received a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of British Columbia with a major in History, a master’s degree from St Catharine’s College, Cambridge, a Master of Divinity degree from the University of Trinity College and an honorary Doctor of Sacred Letters degree from the University of Toronto, another honorary degree from the University of Alabama, and in 1973 attended Harvard University’s Advanced Management Program. In 2002, he received the Alumni Award of Distinction from the University of British Columbia.
During twelve years with the Canadian foreign service, MacLaren’s postings included Hanoi, Saigon, Prague and the United Nations in New York and Geneva. He served as the Canadian Chair of the Canada-Europe Round Table and the Canadian Institute for International Affairs. He has also served on the Canadian and British board of directors of Deutsche Bank plus a number of other multi-national corporations. He is also the Honorary Colonel of the 7th Toronto Regiment, Royal Canadian Artillery. MacLaren is currently the Chairman of the Canada-India Business Council.
His historical book, Canadians on the Nile, 1882–1898 was published in 1978 and the following year he was elected to the Canadian House of Commons as the Liberal MP for Etobicoke North. In June 1983, MacLaren was appointed by Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau as Minister of State [Finance]. In June 1984, he was appointed to John Turner’s short-lived cabinet as Minister of National Revenue, but was defeated in the September election by Conservative Bob Pennock. In 1988, he was again elected MP for Etobicoke North. After the Liberals won the 1993 election, he was appointed Minister of International Trade, but resigned that position and his seat in 1996, when he was appointed High Commissioner for Canada in the United Kingdom. He served in that position until 2000.
Roy MacLaren is currently the Chairman of the Canada-India Business Council he also co-Chairs the Canada Europe Roundtable for Business, sits on the Council of the Champlain Society, the Executive Committee of the Trilateral Commission, the board of directors of the Royal Ontario Museum Foundation Board, is President of St Catharine’s College Society, and a director of The Council for Business and the Arts in Canada. His published writings reflect his personal and professional experience, much of it concentrating on Canada’s international history.
While serving as High Commissioner in London, he published the historically significant diaries of explorer William Stairs. The depiction on the book cover of the expedition up Mt. Ruwenzori is based on a sketch by William Stairs now in the National Archives of Canada.

Paul Hartal

Paul Hartal (born 1936) is a Canadian painter and poet, born in Szeged, Hungary. He has created the term “Lyrical Conceptualism” to characterize his style in both painting and poetry, and has created a manifesto to describe his thesis.

Malcolm Cross

Malcolm Cross’s biography, age, height, fact, career, awards, net worth, salary, income, family tree, personal life and life story.

Hannah Adams

Hannah Adams (October 2, 1755 – December 15, 1831) was an author of books on comparative religion and early United States history, born in Medfield, Massachusetts and died in Brookline. She was the first woman in the U.S. who worked professionally as a writer.

Richard A. Muller

Richard A. Muller (born January 6, 1944) is an American physicist and professor of physics at the University of California, Berkeley. He is also a faculty senior scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Most recently, in early 2010, Muller and his daughter Elizabeth founded the group Berkeley Earth, an independent 501(c)(3) non-profit aimed at addressing some of the major concerns of the climate change sceptics, in particular the global surface temperature record.

Bill Adams

Bill Adams’s biography, age, height, fact, career, awards, net worth, salary, income, family tree, personal life and life story.

Jonathan Garfinkel

Jonathan Garfinkel’s biography, age, height, fact, career, awards, net worth, salary, income, family tree, personal life and life story.

Ross Honsberger

Ross Honsberger (1929–2016) was a Canadian mathematician and author on recreational mathematics.

Paul Simpson-Housley

Paul Simpson-Housley’s biography, age, height, fact, career, awards, net worth, salary, income, family tree, personal life and life story.

Gerald Kelly

Gerald Kelly’s biography, age, height, fact, career, awards, net worth, salary, income, family tree, personal life and life story.

Robert Hunter (journalist)

Robert (Bob) Lorne Hunter (October 13, 1941 – May 2, 2005) was a Canadian environmentalist, journalist, author and politician. He was a member of the Don’t Make a Wave Committee in 1969, and a co-founder of Greenpeace in 1971 and its first president. He led the first on-sea anti-whaling campaigns in the world, against Russian and Australian whalers, which helped lead to the ban on commercial whaling. He campaigned against nuclear testing, the Canadian seal hunt and later, climate change with his book Thermageddon: Countdown to 2030. He was named by Time as one of the “Eco-Heroes” of the 20th century and is charged with coining the terms “mindbombs” and “eco-warrior” (a run-off from the Legend of the Rainbow Warriors, a popular hippie and environmentalist belief).

R. H. Esquire

R. H. Esquire’s biography, age, height, fact, career, awards, net worth, salary, income, family tree, personal life and life story.

Stacy Schiff

Stacy Madeleine Schiff (born October 26, 1961) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American nonfiction author and guest columnist for The New York Times.

Carol Bolt

Carol Bolt (August 25, 1941 – November 28, 2000) was a Canadian playwright. She was a founding member and, for several years, president of the Playwrights Union of Canada.
Bolt’s best known play is the thriller One Night Stand, which was turned into a film in 1978. Her other plays include examinations of Canadian-specific motifs and political issues, such as Buffalo Jump (examining Canada during the depression era of the 1930s) and Red Emma (about radical anarchist Emma Goldman). Her last play was Famous, produced on stage in 1997.
For television, Bolt’s writing credits include Tales of the Klondike, two episodes of the animated children’s series The Raccoons, and a single episode of Fraggle Rock.
Bolt died of complications due to liver cancer on November 28, 2000, in Toronto, Ontario. Following her death, the Canadian Authors Association renamed its CAA Award for Drama to the Carol Bolt Award in her memory; the award is now administered by the Playwrights Guild of Canada.

Basil H. Johnston

Basil H. Johnston OOnt (13 July 1929 – 8 September 2015) was a Canadian writer, storyteller, language teacher and scholar.

Sally Fisher

Sally Fisher’s biography, age, height, fact, career, awards, net worth, salary, income, family tree, personal life and life story.

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