Comics artist - PeopleWiki

Dick Calkins

Richard William “Dick” Calkins (August 12, 1894 – May 12, 1962), who often signed his work Lt. Dick Calkins, is an American comic strip artist who is best known for being the first artist to draw the Buck Rogers comic strip. He also wrote for the Buck Rogers radio program.
Calkins served as the artist for this series from January 1929 to November 1947. Buck Rogers is sometimes credited as being the first science fiction comic strip.
Born in Grand Rapids, Michigan, Calkins graduated from the Chicago Art Institute. His first job was cartoonist for the Detroit Free Press. During World War I, Calkins served in the Army Air Service as a pilot and flight instructor. He worked as an editorial cartoonist for The Chicago American until 1929, the year he began drawing Buck Rogers.
Calkins died at the age of 67 in Tucson, Arizona on May 12, 1962.

Norm Rapmund

Norm Rapmund is an American comic book inker.

Jim Borgman

James MarkJimBorgman (born February 24, 1954) is an American cartoonist. He is known for his political cartoons and his nationally syndicated comic strip Zits. He was the editorial cartoonist at The Cincinnati Enquirer from 1976 to 2008.

Bob Gregory (comics)

Robert P. Gregory (October 20, 1921 – December 5, 2003) was an American comics artist and writer best known for writing and/or drawing hundreds of Gold Key comics starring the Walt Disney Pictures character Donald Duck.

Jim Aparo

James N. Aparo (August 24, 1932 – July 19, 2005) was an American comic book artist best known for his 1960s and 1970s DC Comics work, including on the characters Batman, Aquaman and the Spectre.

Kevin Eastman

Kevin Brooks Eastman (born May 30, 1962) is an American comic book artist and writer, best known as the co-creator alongside Peter Laird of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. Eastman is also the editor and publisher of the magazine Heavy Metal.

Ron Frenz

Ronald WadeRonFrenz (born February 1, 1960) is an American comics artist known for his work for Marvel Comics. He is well known for his 1980s work on The Amazing Spider-Man and later for his work on Spider-Girl whom he co-created with writer Tom DeFalco. Frenz and DeFalco had earlier co-created the New Warriors in the pages of Thor.

Paul Levitz

Paul Levitz (; born October 21, 1956) is an American comic book writer, editor and executive. The president of DC Comics from 2002–2009, he has worked for the company for over 35 years in a wide variety of roles. Along with publisher Jenette Kahn and managing editor Dick Giordano, Levitz was responsible for hiring such writers as Marv Wolfman and Alan Moore, artists such as George Pérez, Keith Giffen, and John Byrne, and editor Karen Berger, who contributed to the 1980s revitalization of the company’s line of comic book heroes.

Brent Anderson

Brent Anderson (born June 15, 1955, in San Jose, California) is an American comics artist known for his work on X-Men: God Loves, Man Kills and the comic book series Astro City.

Mark Brooks (comics)

Mark Brooks is a comic book artist currently signed to an exclusive contract with Marvel Comics.

Tim Vigil

Timothy B. Vigil is an American comic book artist, mostly working in the horror/adult genre. His main graphic novel Faust (with co-creator David Quinn) was adapted by Brian Yuzna as the 2001 movie Faust: Love of the Damned.
The followup Faust: Book of M, was nominated for the 1999 Bram Stoker Award for Best Illustrated Narrative. He received his first popular exposure for his work on the comic title Grips, published by the defunct publisher Silverwolf Comics.

Tony Moore (artist)

Michael Anthony “Tony” Moore (born December 20, 1978) is an American comic book artist, whose work consists mainly of genre pieces, most notably in horror and science fiction, with titles such as Fear Agent, The Exterminators, and the first six issues of The Walking Dead.

Matt Broersma

Matt Broersma’s biography, age, height, fact, career, awards, net worth, salary, income, family tree, personal life and life story.

Kevin Huizenga

Kevin Huizenga (born March 29, 1977 in Harvey, Illinois, USA) is an American cartoonist, best known as the creator of the comics character Glenn Ganges, who appears in most of his work.

Donna Barr

Donna Barr (born August 13, 1952) is an American comic book author and cartoonist.
She was born in Everett, Washington, the second child in a family of six siblings.
Common elements in her work are fantastic human/animal hybrids and German culture. She is best known for two of her series. One is Stinz (about a society of centaur-like people in a setting reminiscent of pre-industrial Germany). Originally published in 1986 as a short story in a hand-bound book, it was then serialized in the Eclipse Comics series The Dreamery, edited by Lex Nakashima. It was picked up by Albedo creator Steve Gallacci under his Thoughts & Images label, moving on to MU Press and its imprint Aeon Press. It was then self-published under A Fine Line Press.
Her other long-running series, The Desert Peach is about Pfirsich Rommel, the fictional homosexual younger brother of Erwin “The Desert Fox” Rommel. Beginning in 1987, it was set in North Africa during World War 2. The first three issues were published by Thoughts & Images. Additional issues were published by Fantagraphics Books, Aeon Press, and then self-published. Other works include Hader and the Colonel, The Barr Girls, and Bosom Enemies.
Barr has also published a number of novels, including Permanent Party, An Insupportable Light, and Bread and Swans. The last two of these feature Stinz and The Desert Peach, respectively.
Barr has illustrated several GURPS roleplaying books, including GURPS Ice Age and GURPS Callahan’s Crosstime Saloon.
Barr also produced illustrations for the Traveller role-playing books, including Alien Module 8: Darrians, the MegaTraveller Player’s Manual and several issues of both the Journal of the Travellers Aid Society and Challenge magazine.
Barr will appear as a guest speaker for the Cartoonists Northwest Association later on this November and received a Golden Toonie Award for her work almost twenty years ago.

Dustin Nguyen (artist)

Dustin Nguyen (born in 1976) is a comic book artist who has worked for DC Comics and WildStorm since 2000. Outside of comics, Dustin is also known as a conceptual artist for toys, games, and animation.

Kurt Schaffenberger

Kurt Schaffenberger (December 15, 1920 – January 24, 2002) was an American comic book artist. Schaffenberger was best known for his work on Captain Marvel and the Marvel Family (during both the Golden Age and Silver Age of comics), as well as his work on the title Superman’s Girl Friend, Lois Lane during the 1950s and 1960s.

Jim Shooter

James “Jim” Shooter (born September 27, 1951) is an American writer, occasional fill-in artist, editor, and publisher for various comic books. He started professionally in the medium at the age of 14, and he is most notable for his successful and controversial run as Marvel Comics’ ninth editor-in-chief, and his work as editor in chief of Valiant Comics.

Jeff Smith (cartoonist)

Jeff Smith (born February 27, 1960) is an American cartoonist. He is the creator of the self-published comic book series Bone.

John Wagner

John Wagner (born 1949) is an American-born British comics writer. Alongside Pat Mills, he helped revitalise British comics in the 1970s, and continues to be active in the British comics industry, occasionally also working in American comics. He is best known as the co-creator, with artist Carlos Ezquerra, of the character Judge Dredd.
Wagner started his career in editorial with D. C. Thomson & Co. in the late 1960s before becoming a freelance writer and a staff editor at IPC in the 1970s. He has worked in children’s humour and girls’ adventure comics, but is most notable for his boys’ adventure comics; he helped launch Battle Picture Weekly (1975), for which he wrote “Darkie’s Mob”, and 2000 AD (1977), for which he created numerous characters, including Judge Dredd, Strontium Dog, Robo-Hunter and Button Man. In the 1980s, he and co-writer Alan Grant wrote prolifically for IPC’s 2000 AD, Battle, Eagle, Scream! and Roy of the Rovers. They also wrote for DC Comics’ Batman in the U.S., created a series of Batman and Judge Dredd team-up comics, and started the British independent comic The Bogie Man. Judge Dredd has twice been adapted for film, and David Cronenberg adapted Wagner’s graphic novel A History of Violence into the 2005 film of the same name. Wagner continues to write for 2000 AD and Judge Dredd Megazine.

Kevin O’Neill (comics)

Kevin O’Neill (born 1953) is an English comic book illustrator best known as the co-creator of Nemesis the Warlock, Marshal Law (with writer Pat Mills), and The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen (with Alan Moore).

Tony Strobl

Anthony Joseph (Tony) Strobl (May 12, 1915 – December 29, 1991) was an American comics artist and animator. He was born in Cleveland, Ohio and attended Cleveland School of Art from 1933–37, with Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, who actually got some help from Strobl creating Superman. Gerard Jones in his book Men of Tomorrow reveals at one point Jerry Siegel contemplated ending his partnership with Joe Shuster in developing what became Superman and work with someone else instead. Strobl was among those approached but he respectfully declined, feeling his more cartoony artstyle was ill suited for such a serious character.

Sal Buscema

Silvio “Sal” Buscema (born January 26, 1936, in Brooklyn) is an American comic book artist, primarily for Marvel Comics, where he enjoyed a ten-year run as artist of The Incredible Hulk. He is the younger brother of comics artist John Buscema.

Sidebar