Composer - PeopleWiki

Lesley Barber

Lesley Barber (born 1962) is a Canadian composer of music for film, theatre, chamber and orchestral ensembles and she is also a conductor, pianist, producer, and multi-instrumentalist. Barber is best known for composing the film scores for You Can Count on Me, Mansfield Park, Hysterical Blindness, When Night Is Falling, and composing music for the animated television series Little Bear.

Kurtis Blow

Kurt Walker (born August 9, 1959), professionally known by his stage name Kurtis Blow, is an American rapper and record producer. He is the first commercially successful rapper and the first to sign with a major record label. “The Breaks”, a single from his 1980 debut album, is the first certified gold record rap song. Throughout his career he has released 15 albums and is currently an ordained minister.

Calvin Woolsey

Calvin Woolsey (December 26, 1883 – November 12, 1946) was an American physician and pianist.

Mark Adamo

Mark Adamo (born 1962) is an American composer, librettist and professor of music composition at New York University’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. He was born in Philadelphia.

Peter Mennin

Peter Mennin (born Mennini) (May 17, 1923, Erie, Pennsylvania – June 17, 1983, New York City) was a prominent American composer, teacher and administrator. In 1958, he was named Director of the Peabody Conservatory in Baltimore, and in 1962 became President of the Juilliard School, a position he held until his death in 1983. Under his leadership, Juilliard moved from Claremont Avenue to its present location at Lincoln Center. Mennin is responsible for the addition of drama and dance departments at Juilliard. He also started the Master Class Program, and brought many artists to teach including Maria Callas, Pierre Fournier and others.

Joseph Williams (musician)

Joseph Stanley Williams (born September 1, 1960) is an American rock singer and film score composer, best known for his work in the rock band Toto, who he fronted from 1986-89, and again from 2010 to the present. He is the son of film composer John Williams and actress/singer Barbara Ruick and the grandson of jazz drummer Johnny Williams and actors Melville Ruick and Lurene Tuttle.

John Ottman

John Ottman (born July 6, 1964) is an American film composer and editor.

Mal Waldron

Malcolm EarlMalWaldron (August 16, 1925 – December 2, 2002) was an American jazz pianist, composer, and arranger. He started playing professionally in New York in 1950, after graduating from university. In the following dozen years or so Waldron led his own bands and played for those led by Charles Mingus, Jackie McLean, John Coltrane, and Eric Dolphy, among others. During Waldron’s period as house pianist for Prestige Records in the late 1950s, he appeared on dozens of albums and composed for many of them, including writing his most famous song, “Soul Eyes”, for Coltrane. Waldron was often an accompanist for vocalists, and was Billie Holiday’s regular accompanist from April 1957 until her death in July 1959.

MRK1

Mark Foster, known as MRK1 (formerly Mark One), is a dubstep, grime and bass music producer, originally from Manchester, England. He is known especially for his work as part of the Virus Syndicate, including MCs Goldfinger and Nika D, which he produces and provides instrumental tracks for, and his fusion of both genres.

Serge Garant

Serge Garant, OC (September 22, 1929 – November 1, 1986) was a Canadian composer, conductor, professor of music at the University of Montreal and radio host of Musique de notre siècle on Radio-Canada. In 1966 he cofounded with Jean Papineau-Couture, Maryvonne Kendergi, Wilfrid Pelletier and Hugh Davidson the Société de musique contemporaine du Québec. In 1979, he was made an Officer of the Order of Canada.The Prix Serge-Garant was created in his honor by the Fondation Émile Nelligan. Among his notable pupils were Ginette Bellavance, Walter Boudreau, Marcelle Deschênes, Denis Gougeon, Richard Grégoire, Anne Lauber, Michel Longtin, Myke Roy, and François Tousignant.

Alexis Contant

Joseph Pierre Alexis Contant (12 November 1858 – 28 November 1918) was a Canadian composer, organist, pianist, and music educator. The first notable Canadian composer to be entirely trained in his native country, he stated “I write not for glory but rather to satisfy an irresistible need.” Although he had considerable training as a pianist, his knowledge of musical composition was largely self-taught, although not by choice as his life afforded him little opportunity to find suitable teachers. Much of his time was spent dedicated towards teaching, family, and work as a church organist, and his compositional output was minimal before 1900. As his children grew older, he was able to devote more time to composition and therefore his later life was his most productive. A stroke in 1914 virtually ended his activity as a composer.

Louis Clark

Louis Clark (born 27 February 1947 in Kempston, near Bedford, Bedfordshire, England) is a British musical arranger and keyboard player.
He trained at Leeds College of Music.

Bruce Fairbairn

Bruce Earl Fairbairn (December 30, 1949 – May 17, 1999) was a Canadian musician and international record producer from Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. He was active as a producer from 1976 to 1999 and is considered one of the best of his era. His most successful productions are Slippery When Wet and New Jersey by Bon Jovi, Permanent Vacation, Pump, and Get a Grip by Aerosmith, and The Razors Edge by AC/DC, each of which sold at least five million copies each. He was originally a trumpet player and then started a career as a record producer for Canadian rock band Prism. He won the Canadian music industry Producer of the Year Juno Award 3 times. He produced albums for many famous international artists such as Loverboy, Blue Öyster Cult, Bon Jovi, Poison, Aerosmith, AC/DC, Scorpions, Van Halen, Chicago, The Cranberries, INXS, Kiss and Yes. His style was notable for introducing dynamic horn arrangements into rock music productions. Fairbairn died suddenly on May 17, 1999 due to unknown causes.

Paul Creston

Paul Creston (born Giuseppe Guttoveggio; October 10, 1906 – August 24, 1985) was an Italian American composer of classical music.
Born in New York City to Sicilian immigrants, Creston was self‐taught as a composer. He was an honorary member of Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia music fraternity, initiated into the national honorary Alpha Alpha chapter. His work tends to be fairly conservative in style, with a strong rhythmic element. His pieces include six symphonies, a number of concertos, including two for violin, one for marimba and orchestra (premiered by Ruth Stuber), one for one piano, one for two pianos, one for accordion and one for alto saxophone (the latter dedicated to Cecil Leeson), a fantasia for trombone and orchestra (composed for and premiered by Robert Marsteller), and a Rapsodie again for alto saxophone – written for Jean-Marie Londeix. He also wrote a suite (1935) and a sonata (op. 19, 1939) for alto saxophone and piano (both dedicated to Cecil Leeson), as well as a suite for organ, Op. 70. Several of his works were inspired by the poetry of Walt Whitman. He died in Poway, California, a suburb of San Diego.
Creston was one of the most performed American composers of the 1940s and 1950s. Several of his works have become staples of the wind band repertoire. Zanoni, Prelude and Dance and the Celebration Overture have been and still are on several state lists for contests across the USA.
Creston was also a notable teacher, with the composers Irwin Swack, John Corigliano, Elliott Schwartz, Frank Felice, and Charles Roland Berry, accordionist/composer William Schimmel and the jazz musicians Rusty Dedrick and Charlie Queener among his pupils. See: List of music students by teacher: C to F#Paul Creston. He wrote the theoretical books Principles of Rhythm (1964) and Rational Metric Notation (1979).
In 2008 Marco Ciccone had done a version for saxophone and orchestra of the Sonata op.19 (© 2008 by Templeton Publishing, a div. of Shawnee Press, Inc.).

Jackie McLean

John Lenwood “Jackie” McLean (May 17, 1931 – March 31, 2006) was an American jazz alto saxophonist, composer, bandleader, and educator, and is one of the few musicians to be elected to the Down Beat Hall of Fame in the year of their death.

David Diamond (composer)

David Leo Diamond (July 9, 1915 – June 13, 2005) was an American composer of classical music.

Paul Dresher

Paul Joseph Dresher (born January 8, 1951 in Los Angeles) is an American composer. Dresher received his B.A. in music from the University of California, Berkeley and his M.A. in composition from the University of California, San Diego, where he studied with Robert Erickson, Roger Reynolds, Pauline Oliveros, and Bernard Rands.

Bridget Kelly

Bridget Kelly (born April 8, 1986), is an American singer and songwriter from New York City, New York. In 2008, Kelly, a pop and R&B recording artist, who has written songs for fellow American singers such as Kelly Clarkson, secured a recording contract with American rapper and hip-hop mogul Jay-Z’s record label, Roc Nation.

Frank Churchill

Frank Churchill (October 20, 1901 – May 14, 1942) was an American film composer. He wrote most of the music for Disney’s 1937 movie Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, including “Heigh-Ho”, “Whistle While You Work”, and “Some Day My Prince Will Come”. Other Disney films that he worked on include Dumbo, Bambi, and The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad.

Oskar Morawetz

Oskar Morawetz, CM OOnt (January 17, 1917 – June 13, 2007) was a Canadian composer.

Deadmau5

Joel Thomas Zimmerman (born January 5, 1981), better known by his stage name deadmau5 (pronounced “dead mouse”), is a Canadian record producer and DJ from Toronto, Ontario. Zimmerman produces a variety of styles within the progressive house genre and sometimes other forms of electronic music. His tracks have been included in numerous compilation albums, such as the 2007 In Search of Sunrise 6: Ibiza CD. The February 2008 issue of Mixmags music magazine included a free CD which was titled MixMag Presents: The Hottest New Name In Dance! DEADMAU5 Tech-Trance-Electro-Madness, mixed by Zimmerman. Tracks have also been included and presented on Armin van Buuren’s A State of Trance radio show. His debut album, Get Scraped, was released in 2005, followed by others in the next few years.

Leonard N. Fowles

Leonard Nowell Fowles (6 October 1870 – 18 January 1939) was an English organist and choirmaster, classical music composer, arranger, teacher, adjudicator and conductor, best remembered for his hymn tunes “Golders Green” and “Phoenix”.

Kosmo Vinyl

Kosmo Vinyl (born Mark C. Dunk, born 9 February 1957, England) was a longtime associate and sometime manager for The Clash, as well as being associated with Ian Dury & the Blockheads and The Jam, three seminal English bands of the 1970s and 1980s. He can be heard introducing The Clash at Shea Stadium on The Clash’s live album, Live at Shea Stadium, as well as many bootlegged performances such as Kingston Advice. His impressionistic reading of one of character Travis Bickle’s monologues from the film Taxi Driver can be heard on The Clash’s “Red Angel Dragnet”.
Prior to his association with the Clash, he had acted as MC on the Stiff Records tours, appearing on the 1978 LP Stiffs Live.
He later became a record producer, producing records by Jack Black, Jack Logan and Drivin N Cryin.
He was a music consultant on Gus Van Sant’s 1989 film, Drugstore Cowboy.
In 2013, he helped produce a major retrospective exhibition of the art of Ian Dury, at The Royal College of Art in London. He also debuted his own punk/pop inspired artwork dedicated to his beloved West Ham United Football Club with a London exhibit, followed by a show in Somerset, England in 2014 during the FIFA World Cup.

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